Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Grilled Foods With Pizza, Grilled Lemon Pepper Chicken, Grilled Chicken, Grilled Corn

Grilled Deep Dish Chicago Style Pizza


Grilled Lemon Pepper Chicken Over Linguine

Grilled Corn and Flavored Parsley Garlic Butter


Curt's Catalina Grilled Chicken Guest Post


Curt's Grilled Chicken Wing Guest Post


Grilled Italian Herb Orange Beer Can Chicken

Grilled Chicken Terriyaki Kabobs


Grilled Garlic and Lemon Scallops


Sesame Grilled Pineapple Shrimp Kabobs
Grilled Italian Lemon Garlic Shrimp with Pasta Marinara



Filet Mignon Grilled with Portabello Top with Shrimp and Crab

Buffalo Style Grilled Chicken


Tips•Brush the grill rack with vegetable oil or spray with cooking spray before heating the grill to prevent food from sticking and to help with cleanup.
•Keep the heat as even as possible. For more even cooking throughout the grilling time, place thicker foods on the center and smaller pieces on the edges of the grill rack.
•Turn foods with grilling tongs rather than piercing them with a fork to help retain the natural juices in the food and not dry out.
•Let meats rest 5 to 10 minutes after removing them from the grill and before serving to allow the juices to return to the surface for moister and juicier meat.
•Sprinkle dried herbs over the coals just before grilling to add a subtle aroma and flavor to your food.
•Leave 3/4 to 1 inch of space between pieces of food so they will cook more evenly.
•Boost flavor by basting with sauces. Oil, vinegar and citrus-based sauces can be brushed on throughout the grilling time. When you’re using sugar-based sauces, such as barbecue sauce or honey, brush the sauce on during only the last 15 to 20 minutes to avoid burning.
Whether you cook with gas, electric or charcoal, the secret to cooking is in the heat.

•Charcoal grills, Coals are ready to use when they are about 75 percent ash gray. Standard charcoal briquettes will be ready in 20 to 25 minutes and ready-to-light briquettes in 15 minutes.
•To determine the temperature of the coals, place your hand, palm side down, near but not touching the grill rack. If you can keep your hand there for 2 seconds, the temperature is high; 3 seconds is medium-high; 4 seconds is medium; 5 seconds is low.
The Direct (& Indirect) Route

•Direct-heat grilling is when food is cooked on the grill directly over the heat source. Hamburgers, hot dogs, steaks, fish, pork chops and vegetables are cooked with this method.
•Indirect-heat grilling is when food is cooked away from the heat source. This is preferred for larger, longer-cooking foods such as whole chickens, whole turkeys and roasts.

•Trim visible fat from meats to avoid flare-ups.
•Always marinate foods in the refrigerator, not on the counter.
•Always serve grilled meat on a clean plate. Never serve cooked meat from the same unwashed plate you used to carry raw meat to the grill.
•If you want to reuse a marinade (that has had raw meat in it) as a sauce, heat the marinade to boiling, then boil 1 minute before serving.
•Perishable food should be eaten within 2 hours; 1 hour if the temperature is 90ºF or above.
Cook food to a safe internal temperature to destroy harmful bacteria.
Use a food thermometer to be sure the food has reached a safe internal temperature.
Whole poultry should reach 180°F; breasts, 170°F.
Hamburgers made of ground beef should reach 160°F
Ground poultry, 165°F.
Beef, veal, and lamb steaks, roasts and chops can be cooked to at least 145°F.
All cuts of pork should reach 160°F.
Never partially grill meat or poultry and finish cooking later. Harmful bacteria will grow between the time you start and finish cooking, even if you refrigerate the food in between.
If precooking food partially in the microwave, oven, or stove, make sure the food goes immediately on the preheated grill to complete cooking.

Never partially grill meat or poultry and finish cooking later. Harmful bacteria will grow between the time you start and finish cooking, even if you refrigerate the food in between.
If precooking food partially in the microwave, oven, or stove, make sure the food goes immediately on the preheated grill to complete cooking.
Refrigerate any leftovers promptly in shallow containers.
When reheating fully cooked meats like hot dogs, grill to 165°F or until steaming hot.
Discard any food left out more than two hours (one hour if temperatures are above 90°F).

••Charcoal grilling times will be faster on hot, calm days and slower on chilly, windy ones. Grilling in cold weather requires more charcoal, a longer time to heat the coals and longer grilling times.
•Gas grilling will need slightly longer heating times as well as a higher heat setting to speed the cooking if the weather is cool or windy.

Sources: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC); Food Safety and Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture; Cooperative Extension of Seminole County, Florida
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